Clock Tower

Out of the Clock Tower



Hello and welcome to the Greene County Archives' blog, "Out of the Clock Tower".  Please join us as we share information on archival issues, news, special events, and highlights from our collection.

Before the archives program began in Greene County in 1996, permanent records were stored in every conceivable space, in basements, garages, and closets. Usually they were in boxes of various shapes and sizes, although seldom adequately labeled, but occasionally they were just in loose piles of books and papers. Most notable were the old records stuffed into the clock tower of the County Courthouse, where they shared their home with pigeon droppings.

Now, there is a clean, environmentally controlled, well appointed location for the county archives, where our historical records are housed in standard sized boxes on steel shelves. We have taken note of their journey in the name for our blog.

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Mar 01

Orphans of Greene County Benefit from Trust

Posted on March 1, 2019 at 9:54 AM by Melissa Dalton

Sometimes things do not work out exactly the way you planned, even after death. Mrs. Louise (née Springer) Greet specified in her last will and testament that upon her death, she should be buried next to her husband. Almost a year later, Greet’s body was exhumed in Xenia and transported to Harmony Cemetery in Brazil, Indiana. Here was where her husband, George was buried. Both have shared the same grave marker for nearly a century now.

Fig 1. Obituary from page 7 of the Brazil Daily Times, November 10, 1921 (JPG)
Fig. 1 Obituary from page 7 of the Brazil Daily Times, November 10, 1921 (Findagrave.com)

Fig 2. Woodland Cemetery Internment Records Vol. 3 outlined in red (JPG)
Fig. 2 Woodland Cemetery Internment Records Vol. 3 outlined in red (Greene County Archives)

Another stipulation found in Greet’s last will and testament had a far-reaching and valuable outcome. According to Greet’s will, one fourth of her estate would be allotted to the Children’s Home in Xenia for the use and benefit of orphan children of Greene County. If the Children’s Home would cease to exist, the monetary funds would be distributed for the care of orphan children in Greene County.

Fig 3. Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (JPG)
Fig. 3 Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (Greene County Archives)

For several decades, this trust fund helped orphaned children obtain eye glasses, clothes, school books, doctor/dental visits, medical operations, Christmas presents and even field trips. This generous and compassionate woman personally understood the needs of orphaned children.

Fig 4. Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (JPG)
Fig. 4 Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (Greene County Archives)

Fig 5. Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (JPG)
Fig. 5 Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (Greene County Archives)

Fig 6. Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (JPG)
Fig. 6 Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (Greene County Archives)

Louise and her siblings stayed in the Greene County Infirmary after their father, Gustavus Springer died. Springer, a German immigrant who served with the First Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Calvary during the Civil War, died before the age of forty. Since the family was left destitute, the mother, Johanna and her four children had no place to go except to the infirmary. In 1872, at the age of six, Louise was taken in by Mary Mulford. During this time period, Louise would have been more or less an indentured servant. After their mother passed away sometime before 1880, her siblings were sent to live at the Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans’ Home in Xenia and the Montgomery County Infirmary.

By the age of thirty-four in 1900, Louise was working as a laundress for a well-to-do family in St. Louis, MO. You can see in the census record that the family had a cook, a coachman, a butler, a nurse and a laundress.

Fig 7. 1900 Census Record (JPG)
Fig. 7 Census Record, 1900 (FamilySearch.org)

Within two years, Louise married an English immigrant named George Greet in Big Horn, Wyoming. George was a cattle rancher in a well-established cattle and sheep ranching area of Wyoming. The couple lived together for nearly twenty years. In 1920, George was visiting his sister in Knightsville, IN, when he passed away. Louise died less than three months later in Xenia and was buried in Woodland Cemetery. As mentioned earlier, Louise’s body was later exhumed and interred next to George in Harmony Cemetery (Brazil, IN).

As we finish up this blog post, it is important to note that the records found in Louise Greet’s trust are helpful because they contain the names and records of the orphaned children that benefited from Greet’s charitable contribution. An example of this is a death record of an orphan child’s father. A trust record can be a unique and useful genealogy resource.

Fig 8. Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (JPG)
Fig. 8 Louise Greet, Trust Record, Box 666, Case 386 (Greene County Archives)

Until Next Time!

Sources:
FamilySearch.org
Findagrave.com
Greene County Archives

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