Clock Tower

Out of the Clock Tower



Hello and welcome to the Greene County Archives' blog, "Out of the Clock Tower".  Please join us as we share information on archival issues, news, special events, and highlights from our collection.

Before the archives program began in Greene County in 1996, permanent records were stored in every conceivable space, in basements, garages, and closets. Usually they were in boxes of various shapes and sizes, although seldom adequately labeled, but occasionally they were just in loose piles of books and papers. Most notable were the old records stuffed into the clock tower of the County Courthouse, where they shared their home with pigeon droppings.

Now, there is a clean, environmentally controlled, well appointed location for the county archives, where our historical records are housed in standard sized boxes on steel shelves. We have taken note of their journey in the name for our blog.

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Sep 22

The Court House Fine Art Window

Posted on September 22, 2017 at 4:03 PM by Jessica Cromer

The Court House Fine Art Window

From the Monday Evening, April 28, 1902 Xenia Daily Gazette and Torchlight,

WIND DESTROYS THE FINE ART WINDOW

In the New Court House---Shattered Into a Thousand Fragments---Loss Amounts to Several Hundred Dollars.

"The fine art window in the court room of the new court house, which has been the object of so much admiration, was unable to withstand the steady onslaught of the wind which came on it with full force on Friday night and all day Saturday. On Saturday evening it became loosened and the central portion, representing Justice, fell with a crash to the steps below, being shivered into a thousand fragments. Only the outer part of the window remains.

CH Window Destroyed Article
     CH Window Destroyed Article CROPPED

The window cost about $450 and as the figure of Justice was the main portion and constituted the beauty of the window it will require probably a couple of hundred dollars or more to replace it. This loss will of course fall on the contractors as the court house commission has not yet accepted the building and it is fortunate for the county that it occurred when it did. The fragments of glass were picked up by a great many persons, the pieces being carried away as souvenirs.

  View of Stainglass in Courtroom

Had the contractors finished their work according to contract, the court house would have been taken off their hands by the first of last January but the slowness with which some of the work moved made the lengthening of this time necessary and by mutual agreement the contractors were given more time.”

                          View of Stainglass in Courtroom CROPPED


Until Next Time!

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